Parking restrictions change

No Parking SignAt Monday night’s Public Safety & Welfare Committee meeting, a proposed ordinance to repeal and recreate a subsection of the code of general ordinances was discussed to allow for exceptions to certain parking restrictions.  This had to do with public utility vehicles.

The ordinance change has to do with the parking of certain motor vehicles and equipment prohibited on the exterior of any residential property and on any public street, highway, alley, thoroughfare or right-of-way in any residential zoning district of the city.

Police Chief John Morrissey said that the mayor approached him about this ordinance change, which “would allow for public utility vehicles to be taken home for service, as long as they meet the exceptions.  For example, a WE Energies technician could bring his work truck home and park it in his driveway as long as it meets the requirements.  Currently they cannot.”

Morrissey read aloud the definition of a public utility:

“Every corporation, company, individual, association, their lessees, trustees or receivers appointed by any court, and every sanitary district, town, village or city that may own, operate, manage or control any toll bridge or all or any part of a plant or equipment, within the state, for the production, transmission, delivery or furnishing of heat, light, water or power either directly or indirectly to or for the public.”

Prohibited motor vehicles and equipment, as it reads in the current ordinance, shall mean “commercial trucks and buses, recreational motor vehicles over twenty-four (24′) feet in length, a piece of mobile machinery or equipment, such as ditch digging apparatus, power shovels, drag lines and earth-moving equipment, or a piece of road construction or maintenance machinery, such as asphalt spreaders, bituminous mixers, bucket loaders, ditchers, leveling
graders, finishing machines, motor graders, paving mixers, road rollers, scarifiers, gravel crushers, screening plants, scrapers, tractors, earth movers, front or rear end loaders, conveyors or road pavers, buses, flatbed trucks, semi-trailers, semi-cabs, trailers, coupled or uncoupled, trailers used for landscaping and lawn maintenance equipment, homemade trailers, skid-steer loaders, dump trucks, tow trucks, or street sweepers.”

What’s currently prohibited is for “any owner, agent, operator, or person in charge of any prohibited motor vehicle and equipment, whether or not used for a commercial purpose, to park, cause to be parked or allow to be parked, such prohibited motor vehicle and equipment on the exterior of any
residential property, or on any public street, highway, alley, thoroughfare, or right-of-way in any residentially zoned district in the city, for a period in excess of one (1) hour, unless engaged in lawful construction work, having all licenses, permits and approvals, where required, which are in full force and effect, customer service activity, repair work, home improvement work, or loading or unloading activities, and, in which event, such prohibited motor vehicle and equipment shall be promptly removed upon completion of any such activity.”

Exceptions include:  “(1) one (1) bus, flatbed truck used for towing motor vehicles, flatbed truck on pickup truck body, or tow truck used for a commercial purpose, may be parked on the exterior of any residential property, in excess of one (1) hour, subject to compliance with the special conditions listed below; (2) any pickup truck, tractor or truck which is rendering service or loading or unloading materials; and (3) non-commercial pick-up trucks with clean or covered beds, without advertising or stakes inserted in the sides, or bumpers raised more than twenty-six (26″) inches from the street.”

The special conditions are:  “(1) prohibited motor vehicle and equipment shall be parked off a public street, highway, alley, thoroughfare or right-of-way; (2) prohibited motor vehicle and equipment parking shall not occur between the street and the front wall of the building or an imaginary line extended parallel to such front wall; (3) prohibited motor vehicle and equipment shall not be parked on a vacant lot; (4) prohibited motor vehicle and equipment shall be parked on a parking surface paved with concrete or asphalt; and (5) a recreational motor vehicle over twenty-four (24) feet in length, on any public street, highway, alley, thoroughfare, or right-of-way in any residentially zoned district in the city between the hours of 2 am and 7 am for more than thirty (30) minutes.”

Chairman Michael Orth asked if cable companies were included in the definition, and they are not.  Also excluded are telephone companies such as AT&T, Time Warner Cable, and the dish network.  The current ordinance may allow them.

Alderperson Anthony Kennedy asked about the whole fleet of the water utility.  Morrissey said that he wasn’t sure if they weighed in on this yet.  The cause for the ordinance change was a We Energies issue.

The change was unanimously approved by a vote of 4 to 0.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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